Monthly Archives: March 2016

The bright side…

There is a bright side to the 24/7 Trumpussolini national nightmare. The only 3 possible outcomes all lead to one inescapable conclusion- no matter what, the GOP as we know it is dead! Rejoice!
Scenario 1- The leaders of the Republican national convention are able to stop Trump at the nominating convention, and pick their inside man to bear the standard. This Standard Bearer would have a difficult time winning, and the large minority of Trump supporters would leave the party altogether. The GOP dies.
Scenario 2- Trump wins the nomination and loses- the GOP establishment is gutted, and the rank and file blame them for sabotage. The GOP dies.
Scenario 3- Trump as president- he will use his power to purge his enemies, and the GOP as we know it dies.

Would a Trump presidency help freedom?

I’m skeptical of any such wonderful tonic for the moribund body politic. Decentralization is the only chance we have.

HERE

If elected, Trump would accomplish very little to none of his vacuous agenda. His congressional agenda would be as dead on arrival as that of Bernie Sanders’s. So what good could result? Perhaps more people would begin to realize that members of Congress, governors, mayors, and members of the state houses have the real power. That the framers of the Constitution created this wonderfully balanced system in which no one person holds the kind of power that Trump claims he could wield. That democracy is messy and frustrating. That change involves more hard work than just voting for somebody who says the right things.

Andrew Bacevich on Trump

HERE

If Trump secures the Republican nomination, now an increasingly imaginable prospect, the party is likely to implode. Whatever rump organization survives will have forfeited any remaining claim to represent principled conservatism.

None of this will matter to Trump, however. He is no conservative and Trumpism requires no party. Even if some new institutional alternative to conventional liberalism eventually emerges, the two-party system that has long defined the landscape of American politics will be gone for good.

Should Trump or a Trump mini-me ultimately succeed in capturing the presidency, a possibility that can no longer be dismissed out of hand, the effects will be even more profound. In all but name, the United States will cease to be a constitutional republic. Once President Trump inevitably declares that he alone expresses the popular will, Americans will find that they have traded the rule of law for a version of caudillismo. Trump’s Washington could come to resemble Buenos Aires in the days of Juan Perón, with Melania a suitably glamorous stand-in for Evita, and plebiscites suitably glamorous stand-ins for elections.